The Fastest Growing jobs in Maine:

A new report found nurse practitioner is the fastest-growing job in Maine.  Zippia crunched state data to compile the list of the occupations and their average salaries.

“We then identified the occupations in Maine that are projected to have at least 1,000 workers in 2024 so that the jobs will still be relevant,” Chris Kolmar wrote on Zippia’s website. “This left us with data for 130 occupations in Maine.”

Maine’s aging population played into the Top 10 fast-growing jobs: Read more

Despite expected nursing shortage, Decatur fortunate with options

DECATUR — Nurses fulfill so many health care roles, it’s hard to imagine ever having enough, but the shortfall could soon be acute. Illinois could be short more than 21,000 nurses by the year 2020, according to the Illinois Center for Nursing.

Some lawmakers are pushing a solution to help the state by allowing community colleges to award bachelor’s degrees in nursing. With Richland Community College, Millikin University and other four-year institutions nearby with cooperative agreements, the Decatur area appears to be fortunate with its options already.

“Not all areas are as blessed as we are,” said Ellen Colbeck, health professions dean at Richland. “Some areas in the state, it’s important with the nursing shortage. For students who need to get a job, I understand the urgency.” Read more

Issues up close

Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are increasing in number and in value to the healthcare delivery system. As more people have access to health care, expanded opportunities for APRNs bring up questions about scope of practice. “Should I do this?” is the question we hear most often from APRNs.

For two categories of APRNs—certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and certified nurse midwives (CNMs)—there is little confusion about scope of practice regarding care settings and patient age limits. CRNAs administer anesthesia and provide pain-care management to patients of all ages in hospitals, surgical centers, and outpatient settings. CNMs provide health care services to women from adolescence to beyond menopause. CNMs also care for normal newborns during the first 28 days of life and treat male partners for sexually transmitted infections. Read more

Leadership insights

As part of its initiative to recognize nurses in board leadership roles, the American Nurses Foundation interviewed Angela Barron McBride, PhD, RN, FAAN, FNAP, an Indiana State Nurses Association member. McBride is Distinguished Professor and University Dean Emerita at the Indiana University School of Nursing. She serves on the board of Indiana University Health (IUH) and chairs the board’s Committee on Quality and Patient Safety. Read more

Travel Nurse

If you’ve been working as a nurse for more than a minute, chances are you’ve heard the term travel nurse or worked with one. But while you may be aware of travel nursing, you may be uncertain about the pay, lifestyle, and how to go about becoming a travel nurse. This article looks at the current state of travel nursing and describes how to enter this adventurous side of nursing.

A travel nurse (commonly called a traveler) is someone who takes temporary nursing work or assignments lasting from 4 weeks to 6 months or even more. The most common duration is 13 weeks. These assignments may be local or hundreds or even thousand of miles from your home. You choose the location where you want to work and are obligated only for the term of your contract. Many travelers extend their contracts if they like the location and the facility has a continuing need for them. Read more

Clinical Documentation Specialist

Many organizations now have clinical documentation improvement programs (CDIs) designed to help an organization accurately reflect the quality of patient care, illustrate healthcare services, and make precise reports of diagnosis and procedures. A clinical documentation specialist (CDS) can play a key role in the success of these programs, yet many nurses are unfamiliar with this career option. Here are answers to commonly asked questions about CDS professionals so you can determine if this role should be the next step in your career path. Even if you decide not to become a CDS, you’ll benefit from knowing what they contribute to your organization. Read more

Interview Strategies for New Nurses

For many nurses, job interviews induce fear. The competitive job market has made interview preparation more important than ever, especially for new graduate nurses. Competition for new graduate positions can be fierce; some employers get up to 1,000 applicants for a single new graduate opening.

At the same time, job interview techniques have transitioned from testing handshakes, gauging eye contact, and observing attire to a multifaceted and evolving science. Talent acquisition now involves consultants, training, and software, together creating a sophisticated blend of psychological profiling, compatibility and competency testing, and exhaustive screening. As a job candidate, you need to be prepared to navigate these new techniques. Read more

The Facts about your Nursing Career

Nursing is the nation’s largest health care profession with more 3.1 – 3.6 million registered nurses practicing nationwide. Despite its large size, many more nurses are needed into the foreseeable future to meet the growing demand for nursing care. As you plan or consider a career as a registered nurse, you should know these facts:

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment for registered nurses will grow faster than most other occupations through 2018.
Nursing students comprise more than half of all health professions students.

Nurses comprise the largest single component of hospital staff, are the primary providers of hospital patient care, and deliver most of the nation’s long-term care.  Read more

Moving millennials up to leadership roles

by Stephanie M. Chung, MSN, RN

Christina, a 29-year-old RN, BSN, recently obtained her MSN in clinical management. She has worked 3 years as a staff nurse and wants to move into a leadership position. Some managers, and even some of her colleagues, feel that because of her age, Christina isn’t ready for leadership roles.

This scenario describes many millennial nurses in practice settings today—eager to move up the career ladder and pursuing the advanced education that’s needed to do so. But like Christina, they may encounter resistance on their way up.

Better understanding the characteristics of the millennial generation can help managers foster healthier work environments and identify potential candidates for leadership positions. And millennial nurses who understand their own generation’s characteristics can more easily transition into leadership roles. Read more