Nursing Workforce Vacancies Reach Record High in Missouri

Medical community, educators exploring options. Nurses have been called the heart of health care, and it’s not hard to see why.

“When you’re in the hospital, the person that you’re seeing the most is the nurse,” said Dennis Manley, chief nursing officer for Mercy Hospital Joplin. “It’s typically the nurse who will be with you at the bedside, taking care of your needs.”

They are often the “eyes and ears” of providers, continually checking in and assessing patients. They also are the people who offer comfort and compassion to patients and their families when things become difficult.

“To say they are an important part of the health care setting is not reflective of the work that they do,” said April Bennett, vice president of nursing services at Freeman Health System. “Nurses are an integral and necessary part of the health care setting.” Read more

Firefighters find respite through second jobs

The schedule of Midland Fire Department personnel allows these first responders to work other jobs on their days off.

Firefighter paramedic A.J. Moore is one who has taken advantage of the schedule and is using his time off to grow his pest control business.

Moore said solving pest problems provides a break from his fire department duties.

“They’re completely, totally different from each other, and that’s the beauty of it,” Moore said. “The firefighter paramedic job is very mentally challenging sometimes. It’s an emotional-type job, based on what you experience, have to face and the trauma that goes along with it.” Read more

Top 4 Tips for Nursing Job Hunters

Research and prepare your profile. Develop a contact network. Set your bar high and work to achieve it.Choose the best partner for your career advancement. Developed by industry experts, NursingJobsToday.com consists of innovative tools and practical guidance for career enhancement strategies. Read more

10 Top High-Paying Jobs in 2030

Don’t believe the hype that robots will replace most jobs by the end of the next decade. And don’t think that futuristic-sounding occupations like body-part makers and climate-change reversal specialists will be big by then, either.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has projections for jobs that will see a lot of growth by 2024. We took those growth estimates and extended them through 2030 for jobs that currently pay at least $50,000. Here are the top 10 jobs in 2030 ranked by the estimated total U.S. employment for each position.    Read more

Nurse Practitioner (NP) Salary

Nurse Practitioner (NP) Salary: Nurse Practitioners in the United States pull down an average of $91K annually. Incomes of Nurse Practitioners vary widely depending on performance components; bonuses and profit sharing that can occasionally exceed $14K cause paychecks to spread between $74K on the low end and $121K on the high end. Compensation for this group is mainly affected by the particular firm, but geography and years of experience are influential factors as well. Roughly one in five of professionals in this line of work do not receive benefits; however, a strong majority report medical coverage and a majority claim dental coverage as well. The majority of Nurse Practitioners claim high levels of job satisfaction. Female Nurse Practitioners far outnumber their male contemporaries among survey respondents. Figures cited in this summary are based on replies to PayScale’s salary questionnaire. Read more

The Fastest Growing jobs in Maine:

A new report found nurse practitioner is the fastest-growing job in Maine.  Zippia crunched state data to compile the list of the occupations and their average salaries.

“We then identified the occupations in Maine that are projected to have at least 1,000 workers in 2024 so that the jobs will still be relevant,” Chris Kolmar wrote on Zippia’s website. “This left us with data for 130 occupations in Maine.”

Maine’s aging population played into the Top 10 fast-growing jobs: Read more

Despite expected nursing shortage, Decatur fortunate with options

DECATUR — Nurses fulfill so many health care roles, it’s hard to imagine ever having enough, but the shortfall could soon be acute. Illinois could be short more than 21,000 nurses by the year 2020, according to the Illinois Center for Nursing.

Some lawmakers are pushing a solution to help the state by allowing community colleges to award bachelor’s degrees in nursing. With Richland Community College, Millikin University and other four-year institutions nearby with cooperative agreements, the Decatur area appears to be fortunate with its options already.

“Not all areas are as blessed as we are,” said Ellen Colbeck, health professions dean at Richland. “Some areas in the state, it’s important with the nursing shortage. For students who need to get a job, I understand the urgency.” Read more

Issues up close

Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are increasing in number and in value to the healthcare delivery system. As more people have access to health care, expanded opportunities for APRNs bring up questions about scope of practice. “Should I do this?” is the question we hear most often from APRNs.

For two categories of APRNs—certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and certified nurse midwives (CNMs)—there is little confusion about scope of practice regarding care settings and patient age limits. CRNAs administer anesthesia and provide pain-care management to patients of all ages in hospitals, surgical centers, and outpatient settings. CNMs provide health care services to women from adolescence to beyond menopause. CNMs also care for normal newborns during the first 28 days of life and treat male partners for sexually transmitted infections. Read more

Leadership insights

As part of its initiative to recognize nurses in board leadership roles, the American Nurses Foundation interviewed Angela Barron McBride, PhD, RN, FAAN, FNAP, an Indiana State Nurses Association member. McBride is Distinguished Professor and University Dean Emerita at the Indiana University School of Nursing. She serves on the board of Indiana University Health (IUH) and chairs the board’s Committee on Quality and Patient Safety. Read more